4 of 4 | Chapter 8

 

“There's something else I have to take into consideration. I can no longer afford any external risk factors that I have no control over to cause disruptions.”

“Risk factors?” repeated Tharp.

“If it were just about the money, trust me, it would be easier,” said Rentz

“All right. Let's look at other possibilities,” said Steersman, suddenly changing tack. “Your company could merge with ASEC, in cooperation with vehicle manufacturing of course, but as an independent unit. You will have no need to deal with acquisition any more, just with development and production.”

“That sounds feasible,” said Rentz, thoughtfully.

“Not to me it doesn't. Thanks, but no thanks!” Tharp shook his head.

“Then you will get your money,” offered Steersman.

After a few moment thought Tharp nodded, “Okay, it is a deal.”

“Agreed then. The moving trucks are already on their way. I suggest we talk to your people about the upcoming changes.”

*

Within days, the manufacturing plant was moved into the first sector at ASEC. Staff retraining began and, to be sure, their number was doubled. The organization signed new contracts with the former suppliers, to which ASEC supplied the raw materials from the neutralizing plant. By taking these measures, the manufacturing process was made much shorter, not to mention the reduction in costs and the elimination of the external risk factors that had concerned Steersman. Dylen Rentz became head of the unit. He later admitted that he had been glad to be rid of his unctuous partner, who had more often than not been a hindrance rather than a help.

The logistics of GlideCraft production was standardized within half a year and worldwide distribution began that autumn. By the first quarter of the new year, the finely tuned manufacturing machine had produced more than 50 million units, far above any conceivable expectation.

Steersman, however, remained unhappy with the scandalously slow decision making in some countries and, in response, he had complimentary copies sent to the world's most important economic and political decision-makers, including the most influential industrial and commercial giants. As about half a billion people were to receive models in a similar way, political leaders could not use them publicly and, at the same time, prohibit others from doing so. As a result, the decision to promote the expansion of DCG technology became relatively easy.

Although the new technology heralded a more beautiful and sustainable future and people happily turned toward the cleaner, more efficient means of transport, still, a series of parallel events was beginning to take shape, drawing the unsuspecting world ever closer to a cataclysmic event. An event that would freeze the blood, and make people try to convince themselves that it had all been a huge mistake.

 

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CHAPTER 1 | EXCOLOPOLIS
CHAPTER 2 | MACHINES
CHAPTER 3 | A NEW TECHNOLOGY
CHAPTER 4 | ATTACK
CHAPTER 5 | THE SOURCE
CHAPTER 6 | THE SCIENCE CENTER
CHAPTER 7 | UNIVERSITY CITY
CHAPTER 9 | SECTOR TWO
CHAPTER 10 | THEY KNOW WE ARE HERE
CHAPTER 11 | GRAVITOR
CHAPTER 12 | INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 13 | ENERGY WAR
CHAPTER 14 | AFTERSHOCKS
CHAPTER 15 | INITIATION
CHAPTER 16 | PREPARATION
CHAPTER 17 | DEFENSE CORPS
CHAPTER 18 | TRUTH
CHAPTER 19 | BEYOND EARTH